Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    1
    Rep Power
    0

    Fat only in my stomach... not going away help!!!

    I don't want this post to be too long, but here is my problem in a nutshell
    I am a 33 year old female who is skinny everywhere else except in her stomach (mid region).
    I weight 147 and I am 5' 5"... my waist is 36" and my hips 37".
    I am visceral fat dominant (its been measured) and I am insulin resistant. I eat very few calories and do 4-5 days a week of intense interval training (spin class) and 3-4 days a week of weight training. My calories are about 1000-1400 a day, the majority of them come from protein and fats, with fewer carbs. Right now I am consuming about 130 grams of protein a day, mostly from whey protein shakes.
    I have lost 30 lbs over the past year, but very little has come off of my stomach... what the hell? I have maybe lost two inches

    Anyone please help, I am desperate to lose inches in my waist fast.

    Also how quickly does it take to lose inches in your waist? I already work out an average of 8-10 hours a week.

    Depressed,

    Apple to the Core

  2. Google
  3. #2
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    4,343
    Rep Power
    123
    I have a couple of thoughts:

    My calories are about 1000-1400 a day, the majority of them come from protein and fats, with fewer carbs.
    This, to me sounds like at least part of the problem. I see the most sucess in my own weight loss (and know others have as well) when I am CONSISTENT with my calories and nutrients. IMO, for you, at your weight and level of exercise, you're not getting nearly enough calories to support your body. I think also that despite the insulin resistance, making your carbs the smallest amount of your macros is the wrong way to go. I really don't think your fats should be higher than your carbs. If I were you, I'd work for a 40/30/30 split. Your Just make sure that your carbs are complex carbs, and not simple white carbs and sugars.

    Right now I am consuming about 130 grams of protein a day, mostly from whey protein shakes.
    While there's nothing wrong with protein shakes, you need to get your protein from real food. Try to drop down to 1 protein shake day and make more of your intake food based.

    4-5 days a week of intense interval training (spin class) and 3-4 days a week of weight training.
    This sounds like overtraining to me. 2x-3x a week weights and another 2x-3x a week of intense cardio is MORE than enough for weight loss. 8-10 hours a week? IMO, seriously too much.

    I think between the bad imbalance of nutrients, the overly low calories, and the overtraining ... you're just not cutting your body any slack and it's rebelling.

    I would suggest taking a couple of weeks - 2 or 3 at least - and being VERY consistent with your diet and exercise. Eat as close to 1500 calories a day as you can. Balance your macros carefully and make sure that fat is no more than 30% of your overall diet. Cut back a bit on the workouts.

    You may see a temporary gain in weight, but I suspect that if you're consistent, eventually your body will reach a balance again and you'll see the weight starting to come off.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    483
    Rep Power
    22
    Dang 130 grams is a ton of protein! ...or am I way off. That seems to be double what I should consume a day.

    Anyway, are you counting wine as calories as well?

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    England
    Posts
    9,351
    Rep Power
    301
    Quote Originally Posted by Carthonn View Post
    Dang 130 grams is a ton of protein! ...or am I way off. That seems to be double what I should consume a day.
    Various sources advise people to consume between 0.6g and 1.5g of protein per pound of bodyweight.

    Many people take the rule of thumb that they want a minimum of 1g protein per 2 pounds of current weight and see how that apportions out.

    Quite a few people aim higher - aiming to get nearer 1g per pound of lean bodyweight (i.e. goal weight). This is particularly true for people who do more exercise... Whilst I always want at very least the minimum I tend to aim higher (but rarely get to the 1g per pound level).
    2007 was 294 pounds

    Got to goal - but currently a little overweight...

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    O'Fallon, IL, a suburb of St. Louis
    Posts
    2
    Rep Power
    0
    I would definitely drop the protein shakes. The recommended dietary intake for protein is 0.8 grams per kilogram (not per pound) and it's for your ideal body weight (not your actual weight)...which puts your needs at about 50 grams per day. You can easily eat more like 75 grams in a healthy, balanced diet and it won't be a problem--but there is absolutely no reason to take protein shakes unless you are a body builder trying to add pounds of muscle.
    Half of your calories are coming from these shakes! So drop them and start eating healthy meals with lean meats, skim-milk dairy, whole grains, fresh fruits and veggies--then see how it goes for a few weeks and if you start losing.
    I agree with the 1500 calorie level--makes much more sense for your size.
    Keep a detailed food diary to be sure you are accurately measuring your calorie intake: 1000 is quite low!

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    England
    Posts
    9,351
    Rep Power
    301
    I believe that recommendation was based on sedentary people and further studies (e.g. Do athletes need more dietary protein and amino acids? / Lemon, P W / Int-J-Sport-Nutr. 1995 Jun; 5 SupplS39-61) have proposed a noticeably larger value for those who exercise regularly.

    The poster does "4-5 days a week of intense interval training (spin class) and 3-4 days a week of weight training". I would class that as regular exercise...
    2007 was 294 pounds

    Got to goal - but currently a little overweight...

  8. #7
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    4,343
    Rep Power
    123
    Yeah, I don't have a problem with the 130g per day of protein. I get that myself - with only one protein shake a day.

    What I think could be an issue is the fact that fat is higher than carbs. Complex carbs should be about 40%-60% of your overall diet, depending on a variety of factors. A good basic balance is 40/30/30 and work from there.

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    England
    Posts
    9,351
    Rep Power
    301
    Since your main problem appears to be your apple shape and you say that you are insulin resistant - it occurs to me that a posting targeted for PCOS ladies may be of interest to you. As far as PCOS ladies go - it is an excellent posting and there is a definite link between PCOS and insulin resistance - together with the apple shape. As a PCOS lady - I have brought my waist down to 29 inches which I am happy with at my age (with my loose skin)...

    Read it and if I were you I would incorporate most of the ideas. I used a different cocktail of supplements and ended up cutting out all pasta, rice and bread for a while (ensuring that deficiencies were covered by my multivitamin).

    Quote Originally Posted by amandarobertson View Post
    I suffer from PCOS but still reached my weight loss goal last year. Here are my "Top 10 Tips" to help you in 2008.

    Health club memberships will be at an all-time high. The promotional flyer I got from the local gym in the mail today went straight into the trash. I am vowing never to pay another year of ďfat tax,Ē those fifty-plus dollars a month many of us agree to pay for a one-year membership that most will probably use for a few weeks. Of course, I believe in exercise as part of any weight-loss program, but it doesnít require a gym or any expensive torture contraptions.

    Iím sure sign-ups on ediets.com will soar. Iíve tried most of the more popular diets they offer: Atkins, Slim-Fast Optima, etc. -- the results never went beyond losing five or so pounds. Atkins is just so hard! And I consider a Slim-Fast shake desert, not a meal! But after years of trial and error and much reading on the subject, I have at last found a healthy, balanced diet that doesnít require any special shakes or the banishing of carbs.

    I also tried numerous supplements. Hoodia, which I took religiously for four weeks, had absolutely no impact on curbing my appetite, along with a few others containing stimulants that made me feel like I was having a heart attack. But donít get me wrong; I do feel that the RIGHT supplements can have a dramatic impact on weight loss.

    I believe the underlying cause of PCOS is insulin resistance. And I believe this because as soon as I started to treat my insulin resistance. I saw a dramatic improvement in my skin and in my hair: less acne, more hair. And I also reached my weight loss goal of losing 45 pounds over the course of last year. I am 5í9Ē and now weigh a healthy 150 pounds.

    Because of insulin resistance, many women with PCOS have a much harder time losing weight. Here is why: Insulin is the hormone responsible for allowing glucose, or blood sugar, to be absorbed by the cells of the body, where it is converted to energy. If you are insulin resistant, your cells react sluggishly to insulin. When you eat a meal -- whether it's steak, fish or vegetables -- the body breaks it down into glucose, a usable energy form. When you are insulin resistant, extra glucose remains in the blood stream, until it is finally sent to the liver and converted to excess body fat.

    These are my Top 10 Tips to Weight Loss with PCOS.

    1.
    Gradually cut down on refined carbohydrates (white bread, white rice, white pasta and most sweets) and replace them with healthy sources of carbohydrates (whole grain bread, brown rice and whole wheat pasta). Refined carbs have been processed so that most of the fiber and nutrients are stripped away. This causes the body to quickly convert them into glucose. Whole grains still contain the fiber that will allow your body to digest the food more slowly, keeping you blood sugar levels from spiking and help to correct insulin resistance. I found that I was able to lose weight by eating roughly 70 grams of healthy carbohydrates per day.

    2. Avoid all hydrogenated fats. Look at labels. If the product contains ingredients like hydrogenated vegetable oil, donít buy it. Look for products that are free of hydrogenated oils and trans fat.

    3. Moderate your intake of saturated fats. Saturated fat can mostly be found in animal products like: bacon, red meat and cheese.

    4.
    Incorporate healthy fats into your diet: instead of cooking with vegetable oil use olive oil. Add nuts and avocados into your salad. They are excellent sources of Omega-3, the heart-healthy fat.

    5.
    Have lean protein at every meal. This will help to control glucose spikes. Servings should be 3-4 oz, about the size of a deck of cards. Try turkey, poultry, veggie burgers, and lean cuts of pork and beef.

    6. Avoid starchy vegetables like carrots, beets, corn and potatoes. They naturally contain higher amounts of sugar that can cause glucose levels to rise. Opt for vegetables like broccoli, cauliflower, asparagus and zucchini, which are low in sugar and high in fiber.

    7.
    Buy whole foods. This means if it comes in a box, itís probably not good for you. Prepackaged food is full of preservatives, chemicals and sodium which can actually make PCOS symptoms worse.

    8. Start an exercise program you can stick with. I began with walking 10 minutes a day, 3 days per week. Now I have worked my way up to jogging for 30 minutes, 5 days per week. Find an activity you enjoy whether itís walking, rollerblading, hiking or swimming, and gradually increase your workout session lengths and the number of days per week you do them.

    9. Begin taking supplements. (Insulite Labs PCOS System offers the best combination of supplements for women with PCOS that I've found.)

    10. Take it slow! Losing more than half a pound per week is too fast and you will probably just gain it back.
    2007 was 294 pounds

    Got to goal - but currently a little overweight...

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    483
    Rep Power
    22
    Not to hijack the thread or anything but I have a similar problem. The difference is I seem to have it in my love handles. I see other people with bigger guts than myself with no love handles. I'd rather have that because then I could at least suck my gut in. I have to stomach pouch to speak of. My theory:

    I'm either a dude with child bearing hips or it's my diet. OR maybe it's excess skin.

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    126
    Rep Power
    13
    Quote Originally Posted by appletothecore View Post
    Anyone please help, I am desperate to lose inches in my waist fast.

    Also how quickly does it take to lose inches in your waist? I already work out an average of 8-10 hours a week.

    If you focus your 8-10 hours per week on weight training that works the obliques and transversus abdominis muscle, I guarantee you that your waist measurement will become smaller quickly, even if you don't lose fat.

    The excess size of your waist isn't just fat. If your obliques and transversus abdominis are weak, your stomach will stick out much farther than it should. What actually happens is that all of your internal organs are just hanging out there because the muscles which cover them are not strong enough to hold those organs tightly in place. Strengthening the obliques and transversus abdominis has the same effect as wearing a girdle or weight belt.

  12. #11
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    4,343
    Rep Power
    123
    If you focus your 8-10 hours per week on weight training that works the obliques and transversus abdominis muscle, I guarantee you that your waist measurement will become smaller quickly, even if you don't lose fat.
    *cough**cough**bs**cough*

    8 hours a week of working the abs?? Are you freaking serious?

    That's quite possibly one of the more ridiculous things I've seen posted here - and there have been some doozies.

    8 hours a week of ab work????? Wow.

    *shaking head*

  13. #12
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    416
    Rep Power
    37
    Quote Originally Posted by coachlaurierd View Post
    I would definitely drop the protein shakes. The recommended dietary intake for protein is 0.8 grams per kilogram (not per pound) and it's for your ideal body weight (not your actual weight)...which puts your needs at about 50 grams per day. You can easily eat more like 75 grams in a healthy, balanced diet and it won't be a problem--but there is absolutely no reason to take protein shakes unless you are a body builder trying to add pounds of muscle.
    Half of your calories are coming from these shakes! So drop them and start eating healthy meals with lean meats, skim-milk dairy, whole grains, fresh fruits and veggies--then see how it goes for a few weeks and if you start losing.
    I agree with the 1500 calorie level--makes much more sense for your size.
    Keep a detailed food diary to be sure you are accurately measuring your calorie intake: 1000 is quite low!
    you're quoting that number from the 1980 lemon study. and it's incorrect. for active people the number is 1.2-1.8g per kilogram. 0.8 is the inactive population as i recall.

    And even then, that number was determined from the point where protein synthesis balance occurs. however, protein synthesis also has diminishing returns. so while consuming more protein above this balance level means some will be "wasted". a portion of it will also be synthesized too. Thats why I see those lemon study numbers as the absolute base minimum protein per day, not the cap. For improved gains and better long term muscular performance, I recommend 1g/target weight lbs as a starting point. possibly more depending on body type(ectomorph for example)

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    10
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by appletothecore View Post
    My calories are about 1000-1400 a day, the majority of them come from protein and fats, with fewer carbs.
    As others have stated too few calories can really be an issue for your inability to lose those inches around your midsection.

    Could you give an example of what you eat daily?

    I noticed you mentioned protein, fats, and carbs - are you eating vegetables? Heck I eat way too few vegetables as I'm sure many of us do, but we need to eat them. The goal is to eat at least 4 veggies a day. It makes a difference by adding fiber to our diet, along with vitamins and nutrients from natural sources as opposed to vitamin enriched packaged foods.

    Also you said the majority of calories are coming from protein and fat - the fat calories could be another reason you haven't lost the midsection yet. I suggest sitting down and writing how many grams of fat you average a day. There's a chart you can use to figure this out here:

    Calorie Chart - Foods Sorted Alphabetically

    If you're eating more than 50 grams of fat I suggest trying to cut back to at least 50 grams per day. For more info on this check out my blog posting on fat:
    [link removed]

    Hope that helps.

    Sincerely,
    fitgirlsoon
    Last edited by KaraCooks; February 16th, 2010 at 05:52 PM.

  15. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    9
    Rep Power
    0
    Stress plays an important role. I read few days be4 that If you're stressed out, somehow your body tends to store more fat around the middle.

Similar Threads

  1. stomach fat
    By fatbuster444 in forum The Club
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: November 20th, 2009, 12:14 AM
  2. Replies: 5
    Last Post: October 1st, 2009, 11:34 PM
  3. Stomach toning
    By Mista_Tee in forum Advanced Weight Loss
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: January 27th, 2008, 01:11 AM
  4. My Stomach
    By Ocire in forum The Club
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: April 3rd, 2006, 07:34 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

» Advertisers

» Stats

Members: 52,201
Threads: 49,025
Posts: 788,945
Top Poster: maleficent (20,060)
Welcome to our newest member, binhphuong12

Body Building | fitness.com | Supplements | Sports |